From drywall assemblages to paintings of mannequins, this season is rich in art of all kinds

[jwplayer mediaid=”37203″]

Window Shopping. With a truly apt title, this exhibit presents local artist Lolita Develay’s arresting series of oil and watercolor paintings of mannequins. Develay reveals witty, pointed commentary on fashion, consumerism and the subjective nature of aesthetics. Opens Sept. 9, Winchester Cultural Center, 3130 S. McLeod Drive, 455-7340, free.

Carnival of Souls. Works by Carrie Bourdeau, Amber Gardner, Shannon Kidwell and Adrienne Motley interpret immaterial essence in witty and evocative ways in this exhibit. Oct. 7-Dec. 17, Ortega Art Gallery, 1551 S. Commerce St., Suite 210, 218-6714, free.

Art in the Park. Parodies of art walks may have made you apprehensive, but we must respect this 49-year-old Boulder City tradition. The event, with 320 artists this year, has survived with a smart mix of arts and crafts. Get there early for the good stuff—more than 100,000 people are expected. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Oct. 1-2, Wilbur Square, Bicentennial Park and Escalante parks,, 293-0214, free.

Erik S. Beehn exhibit. The CENTERpiece Gallery’s revolving Locals Only exhibition series features Erik S. Beehn, whose open urban landscapes and familiar interiors invite introspection. His technique of combining ink, oil, photography and aerosols is at once consoling and unsettling. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Fri-Sat, Sept. 8-Nov. 14, CityCenter,, 739-3314.

Re-Cycled Metal Art Sculptures. These metal art figures by Dave Thompson may not be for all tastes. But his work, which shapes discarded metal pieces into plants and animals, contains fine intricacies with the right dose of whimsy. Oct. 20-Jan. 24, Whitney Library, 5175 E. Tropicana Ave.,, 507-4010, free.

The Photography of Diane Petersen. The library district strikes again with this hypnotic photography. Watercolors are sublimely incorporated into her aesthetic with a variety of formats, lenses, cameras and techniques. Sept. 22-Jan. 15, Centennial Hills Library, 6711 N. Buffalo Drive,, 507-6100, free.

Humanity. Stylish and multilayered, the engrossing patterns of painter Jylian Gustlin are mind-bending. Her background in computer science accentuates her intriguing ideas. Noon-6 p.m. Tue-Sat, Sept. 1-Oct. 29, Brett Wesley Gallery, 1112 S. Casino Center Blvd.,, 433-4433, free.

After/Effects. Check out the art of Scott Carter and his reconstruction of drywall. Full of neat assemblies, Carter reconfigures basic construction for a unique exhibition. Contemporary Arts Center, 107 E. Charleston Blvd., Suite 120, Noon-5 p.m. Tue-Sat, Oct. 6-Nov. 19,, 382-3886, free.

Site Conditioned. Renowned artists Siah Armajani, Richard Fleischner, Robert Irwin and George Trakas all brilliantly use cultural elements in their sculptures and installations to transcend landscapes and space (Irwin’s amazing Central Garden in L.A.’s Getty Center is one example). Drawings of their projects, curated by UNLV professor Pasha Rafat, are showcased. Nov. 7-Dec. 17, Bean Gallery, UNLV campus,, 895-3893.

Suggested Next Read

Fish Circus

Concert Review

Fish Circus

If you’ve seen Absinthe, which was recently awarded Vegas Seven’s “Best New Show,” you’d never expect the petite Penny Pibbets—the high-energy, crude-joke-slinging sidekick of the circus tent—to have a band that plays any type of mainstream music. And you’d be right. Fish Circus, the six-piece L.A.-based outfit that Pibbets fronts, is hard to define. Part Gypsy punk, part ska and part art noise, Fish Circus has a sound not often heard ’round these parts.



Optimization WordPress Plugins & Solutions by W3 EDGE