Book Bash

A love of reading doesn’t have to mean loneliness with these literary events

10×10. In honor of the 10th anniversary of the Vegas Valley Book Festival, the best of Las Vegas’ visual artists and writers—those whose work is particularly influenced by Southern Nevada—engage in a creative collaboration at the Clark County Government Center Rotunda for an evening of literary and imagistic synergy. Art inspired by prose and vice versa? You bet. Should make for a fascinating evening, especially if artists such as renowned installationist Erin Stellmon are involved. The show runs Oct. 24-Dec. 2, but don’t miss the launch party. Reception: 6 p.m. Nov. 4, Clark County Government Center Rotunda, 500 S. Grand Central Parkway, free.

Adult Storytime. Come enjoy squirm-worthy honesty as you listen to seven raconteurs tell unscripted, first-person and, above all, true bar stories in the latest installment of The Tell. While you absorb the ancient artform, sip on cocktails made to match the stories. Hosted and produced by Dayvid Figler and sponsored by Vegas Seven and the Vegas Valley Book Festival. 7 p.m. Oct. 14 at Artifice, 1025 S. First St., $5,

Killercon. The horror-writing boom continues to explode with vampire, zombie and other frightful tales. Today’s best horror scribes are gathering at the Stratosphere for a pre-Halloween convention. Brian Keene (The Rising), Wrath James White (The Resurrectionist) and Ray Garton (Live Girls) are just a few of the exceptional authors you can meet. Fledgling horrorists should register for the event to meet agents and editors in the dealer’s room or during the scary-good programming. Program begins 10 a.m. every day, Sept. 23-25 (Welcome Party 9 p.m. Sept. 22), Stratosphere,, $25-$125.

Seduction of the Innocent: A Visual Exploration of Banned Comics. So Sept. 24 to Oct. 1 is Banned Books Week, which reminds us that before hard-core rap and violent video games, comics troubled to the parents of middle America. This exhibit of (reproductions of) comic-book covers and original art tells the story of comic censorship. You may be surprised to learn comics are still censored today. Compelling stuff, and this party is gonna rock. Launch party 6 p.m. Sept. 30, through Oct. 29, Barrick Museum, UNLV campus, 895-3381, free.

Vegas Valley Book Festival. The father of the modern zombie novel, Max Brooks (he wrote mega-bestseller World War Z, soon to be a movie starring Brad Pitt), is the keynote speaker and author (7 p.m. Nov. 3, Clark County Library Main Theater). Which means this year’s event will be jam-packed and jamming. Also look for a flash-fiction writing contest, a session on bookmaking, a Harry Potter “lab notes” workshop, and a musical performance by Grammy nominee Justin Roberts and The Not Ready for Naptime Players. This one has it all. Programming starts at 10 a.m. daily, Nov. 3-5, various venues,, free.

Vegas Valley Comic Book Festival. If books are too highbrow, try ones with pictures. The medium of sequential art (a fancy term for “comic books”) will be displayed, discussed and shared at the Clark County Library. Meet writers (Paul Tobin), artists (Katie Cook), and comic-book nerd-rock bands (Kirby Krackle) to celebrate everything cool about this oft-dismissed art form. 10 a.m. Nov. 5, Clark County Library, 401 E. Flamingo Road, 505-3459,, free.

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30 Minutes or Less

Movie Review

30 Minutes or Less

By Tribune Media Services

Fast, cheap and out of control, director Rube Fleischer’s film doesn’t even crack the 84-minute mark. Roughly half of this film works a lot better than the other half. Nick (Jesse Eisenberg) is a pizza delivery guy who gets pulled into a tangled web of bank robbery and murder by Dwayne (Danny McBride). For most of the film, Nick runs around with explosives strapped to his chest, breaking the law with his buddy Chet (Aziz Ansari). The movie is sharp enough, but uneven. The laughs are there.



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