In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler’s Berlin

You may remember Erik Larson’s fascinating and disturbing book The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic and Madness at the Fair that Changed America (Vintage, 2004). His latest book, In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler’s Berlin (Crown, $26), is even more astonishing. A naïve and unassuming history professor, William E. Dodd, is appointed by President Roosevelt as America’s first ambassador to Hitler’s government. He moves to Berlin with his wife and two grown children and comes to see that Hitler and his henchmen are quickly remaking Germany to reflect their own monstrous ambitions. But no one else seems to care (he’s advised to “give Hitler everything he wants”) while bloodshed builds and his daughter dallies with Nazi lovers. Powerful and engaging!

Suggested Next Read

Cadavers, Vibrators, Sheep (oh my!)

Soundscraper

Cadavers, Vibrators, Sheep (oh my!)

By Jarret Keene

Like many Mac and iTunes users, I’ve been saddened by the death of Steve Jobs. But the loss of the music man responsible for technologizing my enjoyment of music in the last decade is something I’ll get over. While Jobs’ passing signals the end of an era in which I reconsidered my connection to digitized rock, this fact survives: Real music, live music, remains a sordid analog affair. As evidence, I cite this week’s offerings, which are dirtier and grittier and just plain stranger than usual.

DTLV

RunRebs