Tour Buzz

CHECK OUT ANYTIME: The year was 1994, and the Eagles were playing at Sam Boyd Stadium during what would prove to be one of several “reunion tours.” (The latest of these comes to the MGM Grand Garden Arena on Nov. 5 and again on Nov. 19; tickets are $77 to $226.) My friends and I wanted to make a Heavy Metal Parking Lot-style documentary to mark the occasion, so we loitered outside of Sam Boyd for the better part of six hours, interviewing belligerent drunks. Long story short: We found out how to sneak into the stadium and we did, even though we had very little interest in actually seeing the band … and we actually stayed for a good chunk of the set. That day, we discovered that the Eagles are a perfectly preserved artifact of the ’70s. Their music, originally created to accompany the drinking of California wine or the smoking of Mexican grass, works the same laid-back cowboy-hippie magic some 40 years after the fact. Despite ourselves, my friends and I got that peaceful easy feeling, and we were a bunch of cynical elitist assholes. Your mileage, as they say, may vary.

THE BOMB: Go to Los Lobos’ Nov. 4 show at Boulder Station ($29-$44) and you’ll see a band that was born for the stage. They play long sets with very little fat on them and they actually feed off an enthusiastic crowd—something every band claims to do, but few actually do. In a rave review of the band’s Oct. 6 show, Joel Francis of the Kansas City Star noted the phenomena firsthand, during a set-ending medley of “Good Lovin’” and “La Bamba”: “The medley reached a natural endpoint several times, but the band kept playing, trading solos and smiles.”

NOW ON SALE: Happy 311 Day, brah! On March 11, 311 plays its semi-annual daylong concert at the MGM Grand ($116-$149). The last time 311 did a 311 Day performance in Vegas, they went 60 songs. Will they go 61 next year?

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Nikola Tesla has a posse. The father of alternating current, the induction motor and, quite possibly, the death ray is the most finely realized specimen of mad science who’s ever had the courtesy to leap out of the pages of the pulps and into real life. He also stands, alongside Jules Verne and H.G. Wells, as the spiritual totem of Steampunk, the genre that marries science fiction to Victorian convention. It’s kind of a reimagining of the whiz-bang Jet Age spirit of adventure and scientific can-do through the lens of Industrial Revolution technology.

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