Tour Buzz

YIPPY-YO-YIPPY-YAY: I’ve met a bunch of musicians I admire, but only one has received an impulsive bear hug. Funk pioneer George Clinton, whose band Parliament-Funkadelic plays at Fiesta Rancho’s Club Tequila on Oct. 28 ($42), is an inspiration to everyone from Prince to the Wu-Tang Clan; a tireless touring machine who seems no closer to retirement at age 70 than he did at 35; and the most colorfully attired man in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. To me, though, he’s just the man responsible for “Atomic Dog,” “Give Up the Funk,” “Flash Light” and a bunch of other jams that helped me through a painful breakup in ’93. So, when I met Clinton after a 1995 Vegas show, I hugged him and said, “Thank you.” And he hugged me back and said, “That’s right, man. That’s right.

THE ANTIDOTE: Former Poison frontman Bret Michaels shouldn’t have been able to parlay those reality show appearances into a comeback, but he did—and it seems to be working. “Ladies of three generations seemed to be picking up what he was putting down, and for some blokes, the soundtrack to their teenage sexual fumblings were met (sic) with very enthusiastic Axl-like head swings,” wrote TripleM.com.au blogger Chris E. Leigh of Michaels’ show last month in Sydney. I’m unlikely to swing my own Axl to Bret Michaels, but I must confess that “Talk Dirty to Me,” “Unskinny Bop” and “Nothin’ But a Good Time” sound as fun now as they did in the ’80s, and I’m tempted to shell out $50 to hear him rock out those chestnuts at the Riviera Royale Pavilion on Oct. 29. It’ll be just like going to the gym, where all the TVs are set to VH1 and Rock of Love played continuously for a year.

NOW ON SALE: On Dec. 7-8, X107.5 presents its annual Holiday Havoc shows at The Joint—the first night featuring Jane’s Addiction (pictured) for $45, and the second night Rise Against for $40. Buy your tickets now, but don’t unwrap them early.

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Aurea Verba

Concerts

Aurea Verba

By Michelle Franco

The local quartet introduced the audience to their style of rock with “The Flight,” a sweeping ballad that transitioned tempos from slow to fast and back again. Heavily influenced by late ’90s radio rock, Aurea Verba filled the rest of the set with instrumentals galore. Bassist Mason Ian and guitarist Eli Southard played with enthusiasm and skill. “Sibyl Vane,” a song about past deeds with a pop punk rhythm, ended the set. The guys performed with a lot of energy and heart.

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