Sky’s the Limit

LMFAO star Sky Blu pulls double duty at Pure and Wet Republic

Emerging from the considerable shadow of RedFoo’s infamous ’fro, multitalented artist Sky Blu is stepping to the forefront as Las Vegas’ love for LMFAO continues to expand. Following the launch of his newest Las Vegas DJ residency at Wet Republic on May 20, he’ll be poolside again May 27, then keep it going at Pure that night for a double-dose of “Who Came to Party!?”

What will “Who Came to Party!?” entail?

Dude, it’s just so much fun because I have a group of friends that I grew up with, and we’re all really creative. My thing is, let’s use the influences that we have from today’s era. One of the people in our crew, he does street art like Banksy, so there’s scenes that go all along with the “Who Came to Party!?” brand. It’s more about the art and the culture where all this music is inspired from that we’re making.

The crew that we have is called Big Bad University because we actually started our own university. We’re taking everything we want to do with our lives seriously. It’s all [for] fun, but we want to be the best at it. So we come here, we work as hard as we can on DJing, production and just the whole experience we want to give when we come to Vegas.

“Who Came to Party!?” is an experience that will completely evolve to a bigger and bigger thing, but you’ll see when you come to Pure and Wet Republic.

How will “Who Came to Party!?” differ from Wet Republic to Pure?

The vibes are different. When you’re at the pool, the music … people are going to be vibing to it, you’re talking, you’re conversing. But when you’re at the club, the club is more “We’re going in tonight! We’re going to party, we’re going hard!” The pool is like a beach party. We all live at the beach in Malibu, [Calif.], so we’re bringing that vibe. And then we’re bringing the Hollywood vibe to the club.

How will your events differ from RedFoo’s Party Rock Mondays at Marquee?

Me and Foo, we both have the same party spirit. I’m 11 years younger than him so I’m into more hip-hop stuff, a lot more dubstep—you’ll see a little bit more of my influences. All we want is to create a party where people have the best time, the best experience, and that’s the same thing he wants to do. I feel we both offer a unique take on what an amazing party is, and that’s what makes LMFAO. So you get half of that when you go to Marquee, and you get the other half when you come to me. There’s like four or five producers and DJs that are part of “Who Came to Party!?”

How did you first start getting your feet wet in DJ the booth?

I was 19 when I started DJing. I was just learning on Serato, and I’d go to clubs and see DJ AM, [Steve] Aoki, Justice, all the underground. Me and Foo would be all over Hollywood just trying to get a little DJ gig. I’d usually MC, and then I started DJing a little bit. Then I went to CDJs, then Ableton—I learned probably six or seven different programs, but now I’m on Traktor, and I love it. I love building controllers—I’m a super-geek like that.

You mentioned Big Bad University. What is the concept?

What is it, is we are all on this earth, there’s so many different things that really complicate the creative process, complicate people from getting to where they want to be in life, so we have a group of people here that are like-minded and we all put the love that we have for each other as a family first. But we all understand how hard we have to work to get the goals we want accomplished. And that’s why I think Big Bad University is the university affecting dreams in a way. We have all these things that we wanna do, we wanna do them great, but we can’t have all these distractions like people’s egos, people tripping out, and like record labels doing this and all these different type of things.

We have three-four [recording] studios, we have a dance studio, we also have a place where we make our clothes and we all together create, create as best as we can. It’s beautiful because you don’t have to tell people to do this do that because we’re all self-starters and we make so much stuff. We just came back from South America and shot a whole season of our TV show that we’re working on right now and we do it all on our own because we all have so many people to pull courses from.

Big Bad University is a collective of artists that utilize their talents to further each other’s dreams. And my goal, my dream honestly is to fully get this real university and it’s gonna be open to the public in about six months. I just really wanna help people in the world. There’s so many things that people dream to do and you can really do them if you think a certain way, if you interact with people a certain way, you don’t let stress get to you, just work as hard as you can and make something great.

Can others attend?

In about six months there will be platforms—no different than Stanford, or an Ivy League school—to follow. Through their own hard work and things, they’ll see the growth. It’s basically something to help people inspire to stay on track on their goals and dreams. I lived in my car before LMFAO, and me and Foo had a real dream. We had a little basement apartment in Hollywood where you can be in the kitchen and bathroom at the same time. But we took the dream and we worked as hard as we can to accomplish what we wanted. So I took that same formula and I’m trying to perfect it with Big Bad University and try to give it to the world and inspire the world.

How do you balance the creative process and working on your projects with the party lifestyle?

That’s the beautiful thing: I structure my time to where I decide, “Today I’m DJing,” and there’ll usually be somebody in one of the DJ stations DJing, so we’ll go back and forth and talk about music, talk about songs and then I’ll DJ and really, really get into it and spend all that time to really get my mind into it. Then the next day will be a writing session. So it’s about focusing your intention. Every day I wake up and I see what my focus is going to be. And then when we go party it makes it that much easier because we don’t have to worry about anything else we have to do because shit’s done.

How do you balance the creative process and working on your projects with the party lifestyle?

That’s the beautiful thing: I structure my time to where I decide, “Today I’m DJing,” and there’ll usually be somebody in one of the DJ stations DJing. So we’ll go back and forth and talk about music, talk about songs, then I’ll DJ and really, really get into it and spend all that time to really get my mind into it. Then the next day will be a writing session. So it’s about focusing your attention. Every day I wake up and I see what my focus is going to be. And then when we go party, it makes it that much easier because we don’t have to worry about anything else we have to do, because shit’s done.

Who inspired your work ethic and outlook on life?

I do a lot of martial arts. I look at great people in general, whether it’s martial artists or business owners, like Steve Jobs. I read books. … Then I see little bits and pieces of their life and how I can put something they have been doing into my routine. So I don’t think it’s one person influencing me, but it’s me taking little bits of everyone.

What are you personally working on in the studio? Any remixes or co-productions with anyone?

We got a bunch of stuff going on. We got Chelsea Korka’s album coming up. The first single is called “My All,” which is about to hit the radio in a minute. Mark Rosas is finishing his album; Shwayze is working on his album doing his thing. And I just got a bunch of music myself. I’m gonna put out some music as a DJ and work on some stuff for LMFAO, but that’s hush-hush.

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