Tour Buzz

A KICK IN THE HEAD: If you tune your radio to virtually any station, you’d have a one-in-three chance of hearing “Pumped Up Kicks” by Foster the People. (Other two possibilities: Avicii’s deathless “Levels” and Gotye’s zombielike “Somebody That I Used to Know.”) A breakout pop hit is a tough thing to come by, and Foster the People is rewarding your patronage by playing what, according to the critics, is a fun live show. “Foster the People riffles through various idioms,” wrote the New York Times’ Jon Pareles after the band’s May 29 show, “but makes sure each segment holds an insistent little tune.” And after the band’s June 14 show in Philadelphia, Phillyburbs.com’s Scott Brown said they “put on an unforgettable party of a show.” Both writers intimated that “Pumped Up Kicks” is overexposed. The band plays poolside at the Cosmopolitan on July 7 ($48; sold out), and I think it’d be funny if they left one particular song out of their set.

BREAK IT UP: Sometimes I do this little thing where I tweak the noses of bands that come to our decent, upstanding town representing themselves as the genuine article, but are missing several key members. I draw this information from Wikipedia, which I figure has a plus/minus one departed member margin of error. Now here’s the part where I tell how how many members Foreigner has lost since its formation in 1976. Ready? The Foreigner that’s playing Sunset Station on July 7 ($35-$97) has 29 former members listed, a new record for this column. Even singer Lou Gramm, the man who sang every single one of Foreigner’s hits, isn’t in the band anymore. Wow.

NOW ON SALE: This Nov. 23 spawns a monster in the shape of a Morrissey concert at the Chelsea at the Cosmopolitan ($84). Rumors are abound that the Mozz may be retiring in two years, so you may want to pony up.

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Hyper-Linkage

Art

Hyper-Linkage

By Cynthia Behr Warso

The concept for the new show at the Contemporary Arts Center is cerebral in the extreme. Called The Garden of Forking Paths, the show’s title is based on the short story of the same name by Jorge Luis Borges, first published in 1941. In it, Borges created a narrative that could be interpreted in any number of ways (in retrospect, Borges’ story foreshadowed our use of hypertext links on the Internet). It is also the conceptual genesis for the CAC’s featured collaboration by three emerging artists from Philadelphia: Katie Baldwin, Katie Murken, and Nichola Kinch.

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