The Smith Center’s Promising First Full Season

Forging into its first full season, The Smith Center for the Performing Arts has, as expected, a full slate to fill its three venues—Reynolds Hall, the Cabaret Jazz room and Troesch Studio Theater. Among the highlights:

Wicked: The story The Wizard of Oz never told you in the form of the hit Broadway musical, Aug. 29-Oct. 7. Yes, tickets are still available.

Doc Severinsen and the San Miguel Five: Legendary Tonight Show bandleader/trumpeter in a program of Latin rhythms and jazz, Oct. 12-13.

A State of the Union Conversation: An Evening with Frank Rich & Fran Lebowitz: Wit and insight from the social commentator and New York magazine’s writer-at-large, Oct. 17.

Israeli Philharmonic Orchestra: Music of Schubert, Chopin and Brahms by the acclaimed orchestra led by Zubin Mehta and pianist Yuja Wang, Oct. 29.

Steppin Out With Ben Vereen: The Tony Award-winning showman takes audiences on a journey through his storied career via what he does best: song and dance, Nov. 10.

Betty Buckley Starring in: Ah Men! The Boys of Broadway: The Great White Way dynamo belting out “men’s songs” from Sweeney Todd, West Side Story, Guys and Dolls and others, Nov. 15-18.

Las Vegas Philharmonic: Our local classical ensemble presents four programs for the fall, beginning with its opening-night Masterworks concert (Oct. 20). In a case of musical deja vu—following the Henderson Symphony Orchestra’s accompaniment to Charlie Chaplin’s Modern Times back in June—the Philharmonic presents Charlie Chaplin’s “City Lights” (Nov. 3). Featuring some offbeat casting, An American Portrait gives us Zappos.com CEO Tony Hseih narrating Aaron Copland’s musical portrait of Abraham Lincoln (Nov. 17). And a Christmas-themed A Very Vegas Holiday welcomes guest narrators Mayor Carolyn Goodman and ex-Mayor Oscar Goodman (Dec. 8).

Suggested Next Read

Total Recall

Short Reviews

Total Recall

By Tribune Media Services

(PG-13) ★★★☆☆ Original this thing is not. While director Len Wiseman’s futuristic film is more hectic than inspired, it certainly moves. Douglas Quaid (Colin Farrell) lives a decent life with his wife Lori (Kate Beckinsale). Restless, he visits a dream factory for a memory-implant vacation, which doesn’t go well. Chaos, hover car chases, confused identity and reality ensue. Quaid spends much of the film on the run or surviving ridiculous falls. It’s great visually, but a little too predictable, even for a remake.

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