Is This the Home of Tomorrow?

How one environmentally conscious architect hopes to shift the foundation of home building

Photo courtesy Tozier, LTD.

Photo courtesy Tozier, LTD.

There’s an unusual house being built at 328 N. Lisbon Street in Henderson. Its silver exterior clashes with the earth tones around it. Its roof is curved. Its floor is concrete. Those who pass by could mistake it for a military bunker, or a hangar for miniature airplanes. Or a giant beer keg tipped on its side.

It’s called a G Home. And its current shell is just part of a vision: creating a house that has no carbon footprint. Designed by local architect Aeron Tozier, the G Home has been under construction since October and is expected to be completed around the same time this year. Once it is, Tozier wants to stage events and presentations at the home to showcase its features to prospective homebuyers and developers—features that are all intended to save homeowners stress and money, and save the environment unnecessary waste.

In fact, Tozier says the G Home should have no electricity bill. Instead, power will be produced through natural gas; solar panels (including thermal, which store heat by soaking in the sun, and photovoltaic, which convert solar energy into electricity); and, eventually, wind turbines. Hence the tagline: “Your very own charging station.”

Photo courtesy Tozier, LTD.

Photo courtesy Tozier, LTD.

Photo courtesy Tozier, LTD.

Photo courtesy Tozier, LTD.

But what does it cost to build? Tozier says it boils down to about $100 per square foot. (This two-story model in Henderson clocks in at about 3,170 square feet of living space.) A single-level version could be built for roughly 40 percent less. Ultimately though, Tozier hopes developers will come to appreciate the home and adopt some of its energy- and money-saving features. Which begs the question: Could we soon see tract housing with curved Galvalume roofs?

“A lot of people come by with positive feedback,” Tozier says, referring to both passersby and contractors who have expressed interest in the house. “They understand. They ask, ‘Is it a green home?’” It is, indeed. Tozier says the first G Home prototype (built in Southern California in 2007) exceeded the U.S. Department of Energy’s REScheck guidelines by 56 percent. He expects the Henderson G Home to top that.

To help fund energy-awareness events at the home, Tozier is running a Kickstarter campaign through May 30 in hopes of raising $40,000. If he doesn’t reach that goal, Tozier says he’ll try to attract sponsors and/or pay out of pocket. His mission is to open some eyes to everything a G Home has to offer. “There’s going to be a time when resources are scarce,” Tozier says. “We have to design with that in mind for the future.”

Photo courtesy Tozier, LTD.

Photo courtesy Tozier, LTD.

For more information on the G Home, visit GHomeLV.com.



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