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Michael Green

Michael Green

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Green is a professor of history at CSN and the author of several books on the Civil War era and on the history of Nevada and Las Vegas. He also edits the Nevada Historical Society Quarterly and the Wilbur S. Shepperson Series in Nevada History for the University of Nevada Press, and writes "Nevada Yesterdays" for KNPR and columns for the Nevada's Washington Watch newsletter.

Politics

Bute vs Johnson - Showtime Championship Boxing

Can Republicans Get It Right in 2015?

A year ago, if you had predicted Cresent Hardy would be elected to Congress, Michele Fiore would be in (and out of) the leadership of the Nevada Assembly and Barbara Cegavske would be our secretary of state, you would have been sent to the Nevada State Home for the Prediction Impaired. And by now, you would have been released. Read More

The Legal Issue

Supremecourtofnevada

Nevada Law: A History Lesson

John Adams talked of the need for “a government of laws, and not of men,” while Frank Zappa called the United States “a nation of laws, badly written and randomly enforced.” While Adams was the greater founding father, Zappa had a point: Who we are and what we think shapes our laws, and this is particularly true within each of our 50 states. Read More

Politics

voting illustration_by_jon_estrada_HOMEPAGE

Election Primer

Without a doubt, voter turnout will be lower for next month’s elections than in presidential years. And that’s shameful, because the issues and campaigns in off-year elections often have a bigger local impact than presidential elections do—really. If you are among those headed to the polls on or before November 4, here are some of the more important issues to consider. Read More

Politics

NevadaEducation

On Education, Nevadans Want a Free Ride

According to the latest “Kids Count” report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, in Nevada, kids don’t count, and too many kids can’t count. Nevada’s public school system ranked the worst in the nation for the third straight year, and speaking to the Review-Journal, state superintendent of education Dale Erquiaga. inadvertently offered an illustration of why. Read More