Vegas Seven

Caesars Entertainment

  • A Small Bite

    Gordon Ramsay to Expand His Las Vegas Presence

    By David Morris

    Word from several Fox Television showrunners is that the boisterous Brit will soon take over the Strip-fronting Serendipity 3 space at Caesars Palace.

  • Green Felt Journal

    Caesars’ Changing Empire

    By David G. Schwartz

    Two recent moves by Caesars Entertainment say a great deal about where the gambling industry is headed.

  • Openings

    Caesars Confirms Name, Details of New ‘Parisian-Inspired’ Boutique Hotel, The Cromwell

    New details emerged today about the 188-room boutique hotel and casino Caesars Entertainment is building in the former Bill’s Gamblin’ Hall & Saloon space. The luxury property, which Caesars officially confirmed will be called The Cromwell, will open in the spring and will draw inspiration from Paris’ Coste Hotel, with accomodations modeled after Parisian loft-style […]

  • Gossip

    Goodbye Gansevoort—Bill’s Is Now The Cromwell

    After being unceremoniously and publicly stripped of its name at the 11th hour, sources say the boutique hotel being built on the corner of Las Vegas Boulevard and Flamingo Road has a new one: The Cromwell. Caesars Entertainment is presently in the midst of a $185 million overhaul of Bill’s Gamblin’ Hall & Saloon into […]

  • Green Felt Journal

    Gansevoort–Caesars Breakup Shows Casinos’ Vulnerability to Regulators

    By David G. Schwartz

    Over the weekend, the Massachusetts Gaming Commission shuffled the deck on Caesars Entertainment. The gaming giant is pushing a three-pronged strategy to strengthen its tenuous market position: a revival of its mammoth Las Vegas portfolio, with increased incremental spending thanks to Linq; the success of its online gaming site WSOP.com; and domestic expansion.

  • Green Felt Journal

    Casino Concentration and the Logic of Empire

    By David G. Schwartz

    For the Las Vegas casino industry, the past decade has been defined by two things: consolidation and disaster. From 2000 to 2008, Las Vegas Strip casino operators acquired each other until two companies—today they are known as MGM Resorts International and Caesars Entertainment Corporation—controlled nearly two-thirds of the Strip corridor casino market. The following three years is where the disaster, in the form of the recession, comes in.

  • Giada, You Oughta … Come to Vegas

    By David Morris

    Details have been scarce on Caesars Entertainment’s transformation of Bill’s Gamblin’ Hall into the Gansevoort—a swank hotel brand with outposts in New York and the Turks and Caicos. But the company’s most recent SEC filings reveal that, aside from a 65,000-square foot rooftop night- and beachclub spearheaded by Victor Drai, the company also plans to add a second-floor restaurant.

  • Hospitality

    Resort Fees May Cost Casinos Goodwill

    By David G. Schwartz

    Pop quiz: You run a hotel in a destination that’s had a rough few years and is reliant on customer goodwill for repeat visitation. Someone tells you a way that you can make more money from your customers, at the cost of annoying and potentially alienating them. Do you: A) Ask them if they’ve lost their mind. B) Conduct a survey of guests to gauge just how receptive they are to the idea. C) Apologize profusely to guests and implement this innovation in as transparent a method as possible.

  • Big News Week Shows Shifting Media Landscape

    By David G. Schwartz

    It’s been a busy half-week for Las Vegas casino news. In the past three days, • MGM Resorts CEO Jim Murren announced that the company might sell parts of its CityCenter development, which was proposed in 2005 (and opened in 2009) as a path-breaking project that would change the Strip forever. •Wynn Resorts mega-shareholder Kazuo Okada, who has been feuding with chairman Steve Wynn, announced that he is resigning his seat on the company’s board of directors, though as far as the legal tussle goes, he has not yet begun to fight.

  • Green Felt Journal

    The Strip in 2013: Recovery and Retrenchment

    By David G. Schwartz

    The New Year has its restorative elements—the celebrations, the resolutions, the fresh hopes. But, against the background of the Great Recession, it’s also another occasion to fret about what lies ahead for Las Vegas casinos.

  • Gossip

    Bill’s Soon to Be No More; Drai to Helm Nightlife

    By Jason Scavone

    The long-gestating overhaul of Bill’s Gamblin’ Hall & Saloon (which really should feature the term “old-timey” in there somewhere) is finally coming to pass. Caesars is shutting it down Feb. 4, proceeding with a $185 million overhaul and opening it up under a new name in early 2014.

  • Lanni’s Innovations Make Him Worthy Sarno Winner

    By David G. Schwartz

    The American Gaming Association today announced that Terry Lanni, who passed away in 2011, will be receiving the Sarno Award for Lifetime Achievement in Casino Design at this year’s Global Gaming Expo.

  • Stage

    Bye-Bye Bunnies

    By Jason Scavone

    When Dov Davidoff told his last joke Dec. 31 at The Lounge, it marked the end of an eight-year run for the Playboy Comedy Club at the Palms. The property, which was recently taken over by private equity firms, couldn’t deliver any longer on the hopes producer Cort McCown had for the showcase. “I love George Maloof,” McCown says of the Palms’ former majority owner. “I respect him a lot. He was a great guy to work for. Unfortunately, I wasn’t working for George anymore.”

  • The Deal

    Buffet of Entertainment

    By Anthony Curtis

    A couple weeks ago I wrote about the Buffet of Buffets deal from Caesars Entertainment. My conclusion was that this pass, which allows you to eat as many times as you want in the buffets at several casinos over a 24-hour period, can be a good deal if you use it optimally. Apparently, most people don’t, because the deal is still going strong. So strong, in fact, that Caesars has done the same thing for show-goers with its All Stage Pass.

  • Fred Keeton

    By David G. Schwartz

    It’s a long way from Morton, Miss. (population 3,482) to Las Vegas, and for Fred Keeton it’s been quite a journey. Born in 1957, when Jim Crow still reigned in the South, he was born at home even though his parents lived a mile from a hospital—which was then whites-only. When he reached his teens, he saw his small town make steps toward integration, though it wasn’t always pretty. For example, the local theater owner closed his business rather than allow blacks and whites to sit beside each other.

X
X