Vegas Seven

China Poblano

  • Dish & Tell

    Two New Dining Downtown Discoveries and Chinese New Year Bites

    By Marisa Finetti

    A second location for Flock & Fowl and 'American craft' chain Eureka! arrive in DTLV, plus two Year of the Dog menus worth devouring.

  • Dish and Tell

    The Year of the Rooster: Feeling Gastronomically Lucky

    By Marisa Finetti

    Since food is the cornerstone of the Chinese New Year celebration, shall we join in the festivities?

  • One Bite

    China Poblano Dishes a Delicious Day of the Dead Menu

    By Genevie Durano

    China Poblano is marking the holiday with a special menu that celebrates Mexican culture and pays homage to Diego Rivera

  • Dishing With Grace

    Dine Your Way to a Prosperous Chinese New Year

    By Grace Bascos

    This is a time for eating lucky foods, wearing red and having a meal with your family.

  • Dishing With Grace

    Cooking With an Executive Chef, Uni Season and the Year of the Horse

    By Grace Bascos

    Did you make a resolution to learn a new skill this year? Since it’s still a little chilly for underwater basket weaving, now’s as good a time as any to learn a few tricks of the food trade with An Executive Chef’s Culinary Classroom

  • Dining

    Best Dessert

    Dessert was probably not what China Poblano executive chef Shirley Chung had in mind when she treated some of her traditional steamed pork buns to a hot oil bath. But served with house-made sweetened condensed milk sauce, they became Golden Pigs, a sweet and savory treat destined for Dessertville. Beneath the thin, crispy, golden-fried skin the dough is still soft, hiding a cache of diced pork belly, slow-cooked for 10 hours then smothered in red master sauce. All that’s left to do is dip ’em. $15, in the Cosmopolitan, 698-7900.

  • Diner's Notebook

    Balkan bites, celebrating the spirits of Mexico, and scotch, scotch, scotch

    By Max Jacobson

    My notebook is crammed this week with word of recent event dinners, each of which was distinctive and, in some cases, highly unusual. The one I’ll think of most often was at Forte European Tapas Bar & Bistro (4180 S. Rainbow Blvd., 220-3876, BarForte.com), where Nina Manchev continues to push the envelope and bring new wrinkles to the Las Vegas food scene.

  • Scene Stirs

    Seven reasons to lift up a glass

    By Xania V. Woodman

    1. The race is on to see which watering hole will be Nevada’s first to host Fernet Branca on tap. Rumor has it that two popular mixology bars—one on-Strip, one off—are vying to offer the Italian amaro on a four-bottle system that ties into existing beer lines. Think Wynn would accept a prop bet? 2. Fans of Redbreast Irish whiskey will be thrilled about Redbreast 12 Cask Strength, a full-flavored new version that goes straight from cask to bottle. $65 suggested retail.

  • Dishing With Grace

    Golden Dragon, China Poblano

    By Grace Bascos

    With the Chinese New Year kicking off Jan. 23, you’ll want to eat lobster, as it is considered a dragon food and thought to bring positive energy. China Poblano’s dish features Maine lobster coated with a wash made of house-cured eggs, which is then flash-fried for a light, crisp coating, to represent a dragon made of gold. So simple and sumptuous, each bite brings on better and better vibes. $54, in the Cosmopolitan, 698-7900, ChinaPoblano.com.

  • The Deal

    Seven ways to eat Vegas on the cheap

    By Anthony Curtis

    One of my favorites of the books we publish at Huntington Press is Eating Las Vegas, which identifies the city’s “50 Essential Restaurants,” as judged by authors John Curtas, Al Mancini and Vegas Seven’s own Max Jacobson. The launch of the 2012 edition took place Nov. 14, and it was a big deal in food circles, mostly because of the announcement of who made the coveted Top 10 list. Yes, those restaurants are amazing … assuming you have a spare $300 or $400 per person to eat there. However, I’m partial to the ones that cost more like $25 per person.

  • José Andrés

    By Max Jacobson

    Catching up with peripatetic José Andrés is like catching a whirlwind. The 41-year-old chef is the subject of a cover story in the current issue of Wine Spectator, and the man seems never to run out of energy. Andrés learned his craft at Spain’s famed elBulli. He has since created unique restaurant concepts in Washington, D.C., Los Angeles and Las Vegas, but his most unusual venture, China Poblano at the Cosmopolitan, is a departure even for him.

  • Diner's Notebook

    Beard winners, Sedona revised and high-tech ice cream

    By Max Jacobson

    Kudos to Vegas’ 2011 James Beard Award semifinalists Saipin Chutima of Lotus of Siam and Mitsuo Endo of Raku (both for Best Chef Southwest), Picasso for Outstanding Restaurant, and its sommelier Robert Smith for Outstanding Wine Service, and finally China Poblano for Best New Restaurant. There were a few glaring omissions, though.

  • Cocktail Culture

    Bring Your Friends

    By Xania V. Woodman

    Drinks were meant to be shared. The ancient Greeks were dipping their oinochoe into the same crater of wine before six-packs were even a gleam in a tailgater’s eye. At the Cosmo, conviviality and sharing are celebrated, especially at José Andrés’ two restaurants. Ponche de Cava As served at Jaleo, $42

  • Dishing With Grace

    Like Water for Chocolate at China Poblano

    José Andrés’ new Chinese and Mexican restaurant at the Cosmopolitan isn’t a fusion restaurant, but this dish is definitely fusion. Braised quail is paired with dragonfruit, chestnuts and rose petals. It’s one of the most unusual dishes in Las Vegas, but one that tastes better with every bite. $15, in the Cosmopolitan 698-7900.

  • Diner's Notebook

    A new Thai place, green chiles on wheels and vegan delights

    By Max Jacobson

    Two trends we can expect to see continue throughout 2011 are the proliferation of non-Chinese Asian restaurants on the Strip and a spate of new food trucks.

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