Vegas Seven

Dog Days of Summer

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    Your Survival Guide for the Dog Days of Summer

    By Seven Staff

    Vegas Seven’s editors and writers are preoccupied with staying cool, and everyone has a trick up their sleeves. Here, we share them with you.

  • The Dog Days of Summer

    The Dog Days

    Our annual tribute to the trying times of Vegas midsummer brings you tales of heat, forbearance and muddling through

  • The Dog Days: Summer Fiction

    My Dog’s Identity Crisis

    By Greg Blake Miller

    Sometime in the hazy midsection of the sunbaked summer between fourth and fifth grades, a dozen or so boys and girls from my class took it upon themselves to profoundly alter their lifestyles.

  • The Dog Days: The Heat Is On!

    Words and Fire

    By Geoff Carter

    I couldn’t find the mixtape, so I had to re-create it from memory. Who knows if I got the order right, or even accounted for all the songs?

  • The Dog Days: The Heat Is On!

    Inertia

    By Lissa Townsend Rodgers

    “I don’t want to be cold anymore.” That’s what I said when I moved to Las Vegas from New York City. Grad school was the ostensible reason, but it also had something to do with years of shivering, wearing two sweaters to bed, pacing with teeth chattering on concrete subway platforms, running 10 blocks in 20 degrees with icy blue 30-mile-an-hour winds.

  • The Dog Days: The Heat Is On!

    Looshie on the Rocks

    By Sean DeFrank

    The dog was first spotted on a hot day near the end of May, meandering along the majestic sandstone cliffs. She had been abandoned at the Calico 1 Trailhead, the first stop along the 13-mile Red Rock Canyon Scenic Drive. With the temperature reaching triple digits, it was essential to round up the dog as soon as possible.

  • The Dog Days: The Heat Is On!

    Eddie V and the Cop Cruisers

    By James P. Reza

    I am a desert native, and the heat, as you know it, doesn’t bother me. I love the sun and, yes, it does matter that it’s a dry heat. At about 50 degrees, I privately start to whine; at 40, I openly bitch.

  • Dog Days of Summer

    Farid Matraki

    By Sean DeFrank

    A retail powerhouse whose domain is the high-end enclave Crystals, Matraki has made fashion his business for more than 20 years. Walking past stores such as Bottega Veneta, Gucci and Brunello Cucinelli daily means he has the very best of style right at his fingertips. Dressing the part of a high-end exec is just another day in the life. Farid’s Fashion File Rules to live by from a fashion veteran. Accessory you can’t live without … a nice watch such as Harry Winston or De Grisogono.

  • Seven Questions

    Seth Casteel

    By Matt Jacob

    You may not recognize the name, but you probably recognize the work: captivating photographs of dogs frolicking underwater (see the front cover of this magazine). What you almost certainly don’t know is the backstory. Prior to this past winter, Seth Casteel was, essentially, just another starving artist. In 2009, the Southern California resident and film-school graduate quit his day job in creative advertising with Walt Disney Studios to pursue his dream—photographing pets both on land and underwater—full time.

  • Dog Days of Summer

    Isaiah Orlen

    By Sean DeFrank

    Orlen’s style is much like his roots—firmly planted in a New York City and Miami aesthetic. Accustomed to warm summer weather, he’s a pro at mixing lighter colors and fabrics into looks, which he calls “street couture.” Willing to take risks when dressing, Orlen says you should never say never when it comes to fashion. “Style and fashion change daily, and they reflect your personality.”

  • Dog Days of Summer

    I’m Walking Here!

    By Geoff Carter

    “Motorists are required to exercise due care to avoid a collision with a pedestrian; pedestrians must not place a motorist in the position that it is impossible to avoid a collision.” – Nevada Driver Handbook, October 2011 edition On its face, it seems simple. Drivers, please don’t hit pedestrians. And pedestrians, please don’t jump in front of moving cars. If we could reduce every struggle to these basic terms, wars might be averted and that Hunger Games movie would have been, like, six minutes long and ended with an ice cream social.

  • Dog Days of Summer

    Joe Pickens

    By Sean DeFrank

    This is the first desert summer for Pickens, a Philadelphia native, who lived in Missouri before coming west in January. The newbie says time spent working as a model gives him the confidence to take risks with his style, and he finds inspiration in the oddest of places. “I was eating sushi and the color pattern of the fish struck me, so I thought if it works on sushi it can work on clothes.”

  • Dog Days of Summer

    Newsprint and Juice

    By James P. Reza

    When I was growing up here in the 1970s, I used to flip the handlebars up on my 10-speed road bike, drape a canvas sack over them, pedal my bike across what were then just four lanes of Rancho Drive traffic, and faithfully shuttle about 60 copies of the Las Vegas Review-Journal to six cul-de-sacs just north of Rancho Bel Air. This brought in about $60 a month. I perfected the throw and could deliver both sides of the cul-de-sac on one pass, using both hands if it was a thin-paper day.

  • Dog Days of Summer

    Boiling Point

    By Sean DeFrank

  • Dog Days of Summer

    Wilshire and Citrus

    By Greg Blake Miller

    On a scorching Sunday in late June, my son and I finished a baseball workout, stopped at Thrifty Ice Cream on Pecos Road, bought a chocolate milk shake and took it to my 100-year-old grandmother, Lillian Lorand Dubin. She peppered us with questions about our changing little world—a new baseball team, a new home, a new dog. Most of all, she wanted to know about the dog. Then she repaid us with a dog story of her own.

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