Vegas Seven

Hard Rock Cafe on the Strip

  • Soundscraper

    Upcoming Shows: Cosmic Metal, Colour-ful Rock, Vampire Diary

    By Jarret Keene

    I spent my teens ghetto-blasting the music of L.A.-spawned alternative-rock band Concrete Blonde. From the bracing 1986 self-titled debut to the spooky vibe of vampire-themed Bloodletting (1990), singer-bassist-songwriter Johnette Napolitano never let me down.

  • Music

    Tour Buzz

    By Geoff Carter

    DRUMCORE: How do you know that a drummer’s knocking at the door? The knocking speeds up! What do you say to a drummer in a nice suit? “Will the defendant please rise?” Hey, did you hear the one about the drummer who finished high school? Me, neither! … OK, that should about do it. I’ve gotten all the drummer jokes I know off the table, so I can tell you to go see the Kodo Drummers of Japan at The Smith Center on February 1 ($29-$89) without giggling.

  • Concerts

    Pinback

    By Deanna Rilling

    Have you ever been hog-tied by a microphone cord? The audience at the Hard Rock Café has, thanks to Pinback guitarist/singer Rob Crow as he jumped off the stage and snaked through the crowd mid-set, encircling them like a beer-soaked bull in a china shop—much to fans’ delight.

  • Concerts

    Pentatonix

    By Brjden Crewe

    The self-proclaimed “choir nerds” and Season 3 winners of NBC’s The Sing-Off are an a cappella group of five vocalists who create their own beats, sounds and harmonies. Using nothing more than their voices, Pentatonix remix and re-create current hits and old favorites.

  • Music

    Tour Buzz

    By Geoff Carter

    TOO BIG TO FAIL: Lemme put on my slick announcer voice: Here’s what the critics are saying about Banks, the new solo record by Interpol’s Paul Banks, who plays the Courtyard Stage at the House of Blues on Nov. 29 for the unbelievable low price of $19! Let’s just have a look at the reviews … Pitchfork’s Steven Hyden says, “The main problem with Banks isn’t the muddled words, it’s the uninvolving music.” Well, that’s expected; Pitchfork hates even itself.

  • Concerts

    Cursive

    By Deanna Rilling

    Either indie-rock band Cursive took a wrong turn on the way to play Vegas and ended up in Elmore City, Okla., or dancing suddenly became outlawed here—much to Kevin Bacon’s imagined dismay. I’m not sure when it became uncool to toe-tap or bob your head to the beat. But the vast majority of the crowd chose to stare in frozen-bodied judgment, as Cursive played the slot sandwiched between Girl in a Coma and Minus the Bear.

  • Music

    Tour Buzz

    By Geoff Carter

    CARDS-ON-THE-TABLE TIME: I’ve seen few bands in my lifetime that are as fun to watch as the English Beat. The pop/ska band, scheduled to play the Hard Rock Café on the Strip on Nov. 9 ($22), has a number of truly great songs in their repertoire, songs that you’ll recognize from the jukeboxes in your favorite bars—including the jittery “Mirror in the Bathroom,” the menacing “Twist and Crawl,” and “I Confess,” perhaps the happiest song ever written about the fight that ends a relationship.

  • DJ Profile

    The Uprising

    By Deanna Rilling

    The genre-blurring versatility of the U.K.’s Foreign Beggars is finally touching down in Las Vegas for the first time. Together for a decade, MCs Orifice Vulgatron and Metropolis (above, left and center, respectively) along with DJ Nonames (right) have grown from their underground hip-hop roots to fusing razor-sharp rhymes with grime-y dubstep drops and break beats. Vegas Seven catches up with Metropolis (a.k.a. Ebow Graham) fresh off the release of their LP The Uprising and in advance of their 18-and-up gig Nov. 18 at the Hard Rock Café on the Strip.

  • Music

    Minus the New

    By Elizabeth Sewell and Wendoh Media

    Eleven years after releasing their first EP, Minus the Bear returns to their progressive indie-rock roots. The Seattle-based outfit departed from the danceable, guitar-heavy tracks of their previous albums for 2010’s Omni, opting for keyboard-driven melodies, many with no trace of guitarist Dave Knudson’s signature chords. But with the August release of Infinity Overhead, the […]

  • Music

    Minus the New

    By Elizabeth Sewell

    Eleven years after releasing their first EP, Minus the Bear returns to their progressive indie-rock roots. The Seattle-based outfit departed from the danceable, guitar-heavy tracks of their previous albums for 2010’s Omni, opting for keyboard-driven melodies, many with no trace of guitarist Dave Knudson’s signature chords. But with the August release of Infinity Overhead, the musician, who recently spoke with Vegas Seven, says he’s proudly back on the six-string and delighted to be creating the classic Minus the Bear sound fans love.

  • Soundscraper

    Dark rainbows, Indian lakes, metal sheep

    By Jarret Keene

    Once again, the best shows are crammed into a single Friday night. Let me sum each one up so you can choose your own sonic adventure.

  • Concerts

    Tomorrows Bad Seeds

    By Craig Asher Nyman

    With so many doses of rock, reggae, punk and hip-hop, it was challenging to really find a groove during the 75-minute set from Hermosa Beach, Calif.’s Tomorrows Bad Seeds. While the sound may have jumped genres, the one consistency was lead singer Moises Juarez’s vocals, which displayed his range as an accomplished musician, even as the band bounced back and forth. Outside of an odd but quick hip-hop, b-boy session where Juarez showed his breaks, it was all business as the band riffled through tracks from their three albums.

  • Soundscraper

    Funky Mummies, Brooklyn synth-pop, Queer punks

    By Jarret Keene

    I’m not sure how I’ll survive the weekend, since all the good bands are crammed into Saturday night. They’re staggered throughout the evening, and I hope to catch them all. Halloween candy is spilling off the supermarket shelves, but the real treat is when Nashville funk group Here Come the Mummies get their R&B mojo working at Hard Rock Café on the Strip at 8 p.m. Oct. 6. Picture Kool & the Gang covered in glorified toilet paper and displaying a sense of humor and you get the idea.

  • Concerts

    Dead Kennedys

    By Jason Scavone

    There’s something jarring about watching a group of men in their 50s crank out bitter high school anthems for a crowd that hasn’t sniffed a classroom in decades, particularly when founding members Klaus Flouride and East Bay Ray look like your junior high math and chemistry teachers, respectively. But such is the state of the Dead Kennedys in 2012, functioning like a perpetual-motion youthful anger machine.

  • Concerts

    Adam Ant

    By Geoff Carter

    When I saw Adam Ant at the Aladdin in ’92, I thought he was washed up. At the time the ’80s pop star was touring behind Manners & Physique, an album of clumsy R&B far removed from the punky glam with Burundi-style drumming that made his name. Here was the king of the New Romantic subgenre, jumping on Prince’s train several years after it had left the station.

X
X