Vegas Seven

News Features

  • The Latest (National)

    Sarah Speaks!

    By Reid Pillifant, The New York Observer

    In a wooded rear parking lot cordoned off with police tape, Sarah Palin stepped out of a big black sport-utility vehicle on Feb. 17 and entered through the gaudy gates of the Crest Hollow Country Club in Long Island. She wore a dour black skirt and matching blouse; a bulky red, white and blue wristband; and a pair of leopard print heels. Palin was not there to rally her rowdy base—in fact, her SUV had breezed by some Tea Partiers gathered at the club’s entrance—but to address the membership of the Long Island Association, New York’s largest business group.

  • feature

    Making it Work

    By Ryen McPherson

    I moved to Las Vegas in 2001. Things were good then. All of my friends had jobs, and some of them were buying homes during the property scramble. But my first year was rough. I was kicking myself for leaving San Diego to come to what I thought was a culturally bankrupt city. I couldn’t care less about the local politics and was having a hard time finding an artistic stride. I was living in the land of caviar and dirt. A few years later I was in the thick of it; I couldn’t imagine moving back to California.

  • feature

    The Golf Course at the End of the World

    By Timothy O’Grady

    Photo by Brian OarCoyote Springs in the early stages of construction, 2006. Photo by Lonna TuckerJack Nicklaus (in sunglasses) and fellow course-design legend Pete Dye get the lay of the land.

  • feature

    The Education of Henry Chanin

    By Greg Blake Miller

    Henry Chanin was just stepping out of a gondola in Venice, Italy, when the weariness descended. “I was weak as a puppy,” he remembers. “I couldn’t walk. I had no idea what was going on.” Chanin and his wife, Lorraine, were experienced travelers and urban walkers, but the mile and a half to Hotel Bonvecchiati, just off St. Mark’s Square, may as well have been a marathon. Henry walked 10 steps, sat down, walked another 10, stopped. By the time they arrived, the Chanins realized their vacation was over.

  • The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas

    Only Connect

    In its architectural elegance and sheer scale, the 67-acre, seven-building CityCenter may have opened the door for 21st-century urbanism on the Strip, but its new neighbor, the slender Cosmopolitan, may prove to be the real model for urban development moving forward.

  • The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas

    A Shot at the Brass Ring

    By David G. Schwartz

    John Unwin’s not quite moved into his new office—the artwork’s still waiting to be hung and the shelves are mostly bare—but he’s right at home as the Cosmopolitan hurtles toward its Dec. 15 opening. As of this writing, it’s 14 days, three hours, 47 minutes and eight seconds until the curtain officially rises, according to the Strip-front clock. For the CEO, life and work will be controlled chaos until then, and probably for some time afterward.

  • Why Not?

    Why not repurpose derelict properties?

    By Greg Blake Miller

    These are painful times, so let’s begin with a painful metaphor. The recession has been some sort of horrible dental drill, boring through the surface of the city, hitting nerves and leaving plenty of empty spaces: Shopping centers and office buildings with unoccupied suites, mixed-used developments that wound up neither mixed nor used.

  • Why Not?

    Why not stay dry?

    By Greg Blake Miller

    If you’ve made a recent trip to the artificial body of water just south of us, you probably noticed that someone pulled the bath plug on Lake Mead. So until we discover the Aquifer at the Center of the Earth, or, that failing, figure out a way to legally swipe water from Lincoln County, let’s try to save some of the wet stuff. We’ve already come a long way on this front—under the stern and watchful eye of Southern Nevada Water Authority General Manager Pat Mulroy, the Valley has reduced its water consumption by 26 billion gallons since 2002.

  • Why Not?

    Why not make live entertainment a part of everyone’s life?

    By Greg Blake Miller

    Does nightlife happen way past your bedtime? Do you read the A&E section of this magazine as a form of vicarious living? Rise up, midlife suburbanites, it’s your Vegas, too! We’ve got families, and we can’t be out all hours of the night roaming the mean streets of downtown. So let’s bring downtown to us: Suburban dinner theater! Vaudeville in Summerlin! Live music at 5:30 p.m. over pasta in Henderson! That’s right, Las Vegas, we refuse to put the remainder of our entertainment lives in the hands of Cox Cable. We want big-city nightlife, too, just not in the big city. And not at night.

  • Why Not?

    Why not help Vegas PBS become a production powerhouse?

    By Greg Blake Miller

    If you watch much public television, you’ll notice that many of the finest national PBS broadcasts originate from a handful of stations scattered across the nation, such as WGBH Boston, WQED Pittsburgh, or KCET Los Angeles. Our very own Vegas PBS should be one of them—a leading producer of national documentaries, anthologies and Web content.

  • Why Not?

    Why not turn Springs Preserve into our Central Park?

    By Phil Hagen

    Sounds like a daydream, but it was part of the original mission statement. Unfortunately, an important aspect of the vision was overlooked: The Central Park seamlessly meshes with the city around it. So, instead of a theme-park entrance, we’d like to suggest that the Preserve embrace the urban landscape around it, and vice versa. Yes, that means revamping the perimeter of the property so it’s invitingly accessible in the everyday sense—not just for special events.

  • Why Not?

    Why not bring back live music for all Strip shows?

    Once upon a time, Las Vegas was a place where a man with a trumpet could have a steady job and union benefits. The Musicians’ Union contract required live music at Strip productions, and harmony, not to mention syncopation, reigned. That all changed in 1989, when, after an epic strike, the union lost the battle over canned tunes. The culture has changed, but the loss still smarts.

  • Why Not?

    Why not revive the lost art of theming on the Strip?

    By Greg Blake Miller

    In 1993, the year the MGM Grand opened on the Strip, the great Scottish rock group known as The Waterboys released a song about Las Vegas called “Spiritual City.” Well, it wasn’t technically about Las Vegas. Maybe metaphysically. Or telepathically. In any case, the song’s final, brilliant, cacophonic moments dispense some apt advice for our radiant little village: Everybody’s born to do a certain thing … and if you’re good at it, just keep doing it until you’re fed up, then do something else. Las Vegas was born to theme.

  • Why Not?

    Why not create a public vocational college?

    By Cindi Reed

    Southeast Career Technical Academy has done a great job for years at the high school level, and the Valley has a growing assortment of private trade schools. The College of Southern Nevada teaches some trades, but its core mission remains academic. What Nevada needs is affordable public higher education that trains adults for the kind of hands-on, high-skill jobs that fall outside the bounds of traditional education. From LED- and neon-sign design and maintenance to green construction, Nevada Tech (as we’ll call it) can help students develop the skill sets that matter most in our state.

  • Why Not?

    Why not use empty shop fronts, vacated homes, and hollowed-out office space for neighborhood charter schools?

    By Greg Blake Miller

    We’ve already seen movement in this direction both in the Valley and across the nation. Small-scale improvised spaces can provide great laboratories for diverse educational philosophies and intimate settings for student-centered learning. They also deal a healthy blow to the notion that education should operate as a standardized economy of scale.

X
X