Vegas Seven

occupy las vegas

  • The Latest Thought

    Preoccupied

    By Bob Whitby

    So the Occupy Las Vegas protesters are well-behaved. Good for them. In addition to a gold star and a few extra minutes of recess, their behavior earned them a small, painfully balanced story from the Associated Press, which set the meme local TV and radio have faithfully followed: While other cities are plagued with civil disobedience, it’s all quiet on the Paradise Road front. Subtext: Feel free to go about your lives, Las Vegans, because Occupy Las Vegas is a meaningless curiosity.

  • Vegas Moment

    The Tail End of the Occupation

    A Conservative Talking Point of recent years has been that we all need to tighten our belts. At least one Occupy Las Vegas protester begs to differ. The local branch of the Occupy movement recently obtained a 90-day extension to continue to camp on a small, secluded lot near UNLV. After an initial flush of enthusiasm, the group has lost some momentum; it may take a few tactical and sartorial changes to bring the passion back.

  • Ninety-Nine Percent Gone?

    By Bob Whitby

    I took a ride over to Opportunity Las Vegas Friday afternoon, not to be confused with Occupy Las Vegas. More on that in a few paragraphs. They are down to a skeleton crew at the empty lot strategically located next door to the Double Down Saloon and a bunch of empty warehouses on between Paradise Road and Swenson Street. The epicenter of Las Vegas activism, Sin City’s answer to a national grassroots political movement designed to strike fear in Gucci-shod one-percenters, has turned into a de-facto homeless feeding center.

  • Occupying Paradise

    By Bob Whitby

    As of Friday morning, Occupy Las Vegas finally has a place to occupy. The group protesting rapacious capitalism, unemployment, bank bailouts and anything else you got handy signed an agreement with Clark County that will allow them to hang out 24/7 for 30 days on a six-acre tract of empty land on 4700 Paradise Road, between Tropicana and Harmon, right across the street from the Thomas & Mack Center parking lot. It’s a good spot. Maybe a few UNLV commuter students will cruise past the encampment on their way to Poli Sci 101 and decide to do a little field research.

  • Vegas Moment

    Modern Occupation

    “The Silent majority” was Richard Nixon’s 1969 term for the upstanding Americans who disdained the damn dirty hippies and supported the president’s management of the Vietnam War. Four decades later, the American left—Nixon’s vocal minority—has generally greeted tumultuous times not with street theater but with ... blogging.

  • The Week

    Homeland Insecurity

    By Bob Whitby

    This week we ponder the many permutations of the word “occupy.” Protesters angry about corporate greed and a lot of other nebulous evils continued to occupy Wall Street, eliciting a fusty response from House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, who referred to the demonstrators as a “growing mob.” California Democrat Nancy Pelosi pointed out that Cantor didn’t have any problem with similar street theater from the Tea Party “when they were actually spitting on members of Congress right here in the Capitol.”

  • Occupy This!

    By Bob Whitby

    Marching along the Strip with hundreds of Las Vegans in protest of … something … Oct. 6, it occurred to me that this is the perfect place to occupy. For the most part, the marchers were locals smacked-down by an economy that feels rigged. And for the most part, the tourists didn’t seem to care. As the protest paraded north from the intersection of Tropicana and Las Vegas Boulevard, a steady stream of south-bound tourists, in couples and groups, whispered, averted their gaze and said nothing.

  • The Occupation Begins

    By Bob Whitby

    Attention Las Vegas 99 percenters: The town that’s made ignoring reality big business is joining in the national protest, and you’re invited. Occupy Las Vegas is planning a march Oct. 6 in solidarity with Occupy Wall Street, the loose-knit group of protestors going into their third week of camping out in New York City’s financial district to voice their displeasure with corporate greed, government bailouts and the state of things in general. Our taste of civil disobedience begins at 3 p.m.

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