Vegas Seven

People Issue

  • The People Issue

    Kyle Markman

    By David G. Schwartz

    Kyle Markman knows how to throw a party. In June 2008, it was his job to set up a celebration for the release of Nelly’s Brass Knuckles at Red Rock Resort. Nelly was so taken by Markman’s personal tour of the resort’s suites, pools and lounges—and the way Markman juggled arrangements and handled VIPs during the bash—that he filmed the entire video for “Body on Me” at the casino.

  • The People Issue

    Brooke Olimpieri

    By Carla Ferreira

    Brooke Olimpieri knows that businesses are built on focus, discipline and the courage to take risks. So when she quit her job at Rain Nightclub last year to dedicate all her time to her clothing line, Filthy Mouth, she understood what she was getting into. Today she puts all the money she makes from Filthy Mouth right back into the company. She’s just launched an online shop, and has plans to expand production.

  • The People Issue

    Lucy Flores

    By Jazmin Gelista

    When Lucy Flores was 13 years old and sitting in a detention cell at juvenile hall, she never thought that one day she would be the Nevada’s first Latina state assemblywoman. She’d been running with gangs, breaking curfew and running away from home. But the mentorship of some tough-minded adults got her focused on bigger things.

  • The People Issue

    Sam Cherry

    By Greg Blake Miller

    Behind every dream-come-true, there is a person who was willing to look like a complete idiot to see it through. Soho Lofts was such a dream, and Sam Cherry was such a person.

  • The People Issue

    Michael Parks

    By Paul Szydelko

    When Michael Parks tore his ACL, MCL and meniscus playing indoor soccer last year, he knew it would be a long road to recovery. Almost as sudden—and just as challenging to bounce back from—was the plummet of Las Vegas real estate values, which Parks endured as a member of the team that handles casino transactions for CB Richard Ellis.

  • The People Issue

    Alex Cordova

    By Jason Scavone

    At the beginning of 2010, Angel Management Group was basically a marketing company working with a few clubs. By the end of the year, thanks to its takeover of Pure Management Group, AMG blew up into one of the biggest nightlife players in town, owning, operating, managing or consulting for 17 Las Vegas venues. AMG Vice President of Marketing Alex Cordova laughs when asked what that means for him personally, and then he deadpans: “Longer work hours.”

  • The People Issue

    Robert Dorgan

    By Greg Blake Miller

    Atop a big studio table at the Historic Fifth Street School, Robert Dorgan’s students at the UNLV Downtown Design Center have mapped an urban dream in delicate castles of wood. It’s a virtual neighborhood, a habitat for the imagination, but it’s clearly inspired by the activity just outside the center, where the real downtown, bruised but unbroken, is proving oddly resilient in the face of recession.

  • The People Issue

    Staci Linklater

    Staci Linklater clearly remembers the day she decided to become a hairstylist. She had just graduated from high school and was at home watching TV. A cosmetology school commercial came on, and something instantly clicked: That’s what I am going to do. A career as a hairstylist, she felt, was the perfect match for both her outgoing personality and her desire to be an entrepreneur.

  • The People Issue

    Hong Sun & Hui Zhang

    By Paul Szydelko

    Hiking the trails of Red Rock National Conservation Area affords Hong Sun and Hui Zhang the cherished freedom to roam and commune with nature. But it’s in the cluttered laboratory on the third floor of the Nevada Cancer Institute (NVCI) that the husband-and-wife team truly blazes trails and connects with nature. “You feel you are closer to nature when you’ve discovered something, when you’ve unraveled some secret of nature,” says Sun, who along with Zhang has devoted her career to cancer research.

  • The People Issue

    Austin Russell

    By Cindi Reed

    Austin “Chumlee” Russell doesn’t mind if you think he’s the village idiot. In fact, that stereotype has made him famous. The affable Las Vegas native plays himself up to be a lovable doofus on the surprise hit reality TV show, the History Channel’s Pawn Stars. And viewers love it.

  • The People Issue

    DJ Five

    After almost two decades in Las Vegas, DJ Five has earned his role as the unofficial Vegas ambassador to the national S.K.A.M. Artist DJ community. He is the go-to-guy for advice on Vegas’ best grub hubs (he loves Sen of Japan, recommends SW Steakhouse in the Wynn, and frequents Pho Saigon 8), the dopest vintage designer shopping (he scouts out ’80s Gucci, YSL, Louis Vuitton and Dior) and comfortable chilling quarters (he takes visitors to Hooters, Born and Raised, and on field trips to the Cosmopolitan to hang at friend DJ Vice’s sneaker boutique CRSVR).

  • The People Issue

    Patrick Duffy

    When the Las Vegas Art Museum closed in 2009, many saw it as confirmation that little cultural substance lay beneath the city’s glitz. It was a more personal affair for Patrick Duffy—the president of the museum board had given the museum most of his collection.

  • The People Issue

    Hayley Hunter

    Like most pretty girls in this city, Hayley Hunter did her time in the service industry. And while the money was great, it ultimately left her bohemian soul unfulfilled. After closing the door on nightclubs, she opened a new one, with the recent launch of Creative Space, a design consultation boutique. And despite a tough economic climate, her business has grown without any advertising or marketing. In fact, she’s about to launch a downtown showroom.

  • The People Issue

    Bryce Harper

    By Kirk Kern

    The rush to bring Las Vegas baseball phenom Bryce Harper to the big leagues officially slowed down when his team, the Washington Nationals, spent $126 million to sign a player who plays his position. But that doesn’t mean Harper isn’t primed to make some big strides in 2011, his first full season as a professional baseball player.

  • The People Issue

    Craig & Corey Nyman

    By Xania V. Woodman

    Almost from birth, brothers Corey and Craig Nyman, 33 and 29 respectively, seemed destined for a life in the food and beverage industry. Grandpa Dave owned a deli and liquor store; father Robert gained a reputation as “the consultant’s consultant,” and today heads up The Nyman Group LTD, a boutique firm based in Scottsdale, Ariz., that specializes in food and beverage. When most kids were getting the birds-and-bees talk, the brothers got what they affectionately call “The Restaurant Conversation.” The family biz—were they in or were they out?

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