Vegas Seven

The Hangover

  • The Week

    We’re Over The Hangover

    By Lissa Townsend Rodgers

    Our biggest piece of cinematic PR since 2009 has been The Hangover series.The three movies may have given Las Vegas millions in free advertising, but what message were they sending?

  • Movies

    Third Time’s the Charm

    By Una LaMarche

    Not many people can say that jumping naked out of the trunk of a car changed their life forever. Even fewer people can claim that they jumped naked out of the trunk of a car onto Bradley Cooper’s face. And yet for Ken Jeong, whose breakout role in The Hangover series (the anticipated third and final installment of which hits theaters May 24) as the flamboyant, drug-addled gangster Leslie Chow has earned him a not-so-cult following as the funniest character actor in Hollywood—both of these things are true.

  • Gossip

    The First Lady and the Sequel

    By Jason Scavone

    The cast of The Hangover Part III was filming in town—because that plot isn’t going to cynically recycle itself in a blatant cash grab. But three of the actors got all civic-minded with their downtime.

  • Gossip

    The First Lady and the sequel

    By Jason Scavone

    The cast of The Hangover Part III was filming in town—because that plot isn’t going to cynically recycle itself in a blatant cash grab. But three of the actors got all civic-minded with their downtime. And here we thought the only thing actors ever did in between scenes was retreat to their trailers to have sex with crewmembers or do drugs or have sex with drugs. Or however Hollywood works.

  • Gossip

    Hangover’s Vegas Layover

    By Jason Scavone

    The Hangover was set in Vegas, and The Hangover: Part II is set in Bangkok, but because nobody’s going to go to Thailand for a movie premiere, they had to do it here.

  • The Latest

    Courting the Boss

    By David G. Schwartz

    The Las Vegas tourism business is a paradox these days. On paper, things look great: So far this year, visitation numbers are up by more than 5 percent from last year, when more than 37 million visitors came to town. As far as sheer numbers go, Las Vegas is well on its way to rebounding from the recession. But tourism is not, ultimately, a numbers game: it’s a money game. And with the Vegas convention business still trying to regain its footing after the recession, the money’s not what it used to be.

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