Vegas Seven

Water

  • Eco Issue 2017

    A Watershed Moment

    By Kristen Peterson

    Facing reality of desert living.

  • Ask a Native

    Bellagio Fountains Aren’t Sipping City Supply

    By James P. Reza

    My recent column about water conservation in Las Vegas prompted a spate of friendly (and some less so) queries and comments from readers, including: “Do any Las Vegas homes still have private wells?” “Where does the Bellagio get its water for the fountain show?” And “Whatever happened to the canals that were supposed to be Downtown?”

  • Ask a Native

    Las Vegas Isn’t the Water Spendthrift You Think It Is

    By James P. Reza

    According to a recent report produced by the Fronteras news organization and aired on KNPR, Las Vegas is the most successful water-conservation and reclamation city in the United States. That's a good thing.

  • The Week

    California’s Cup Runneth Empty

    By Sean DeFrank

    The stakes are getting higher as the West continues to get drier. Not only has Southern Nevada received precious little rain over the past two months, but California Governor Jerry Brown last week declared that the Golden State could be in the midst of a “mega-drought.”

  • Next Exit

    Soaking Up Meaning: A Flood, a Honcho and the Significance of Clean Water

    Standing barefoot in the puddle in my house, I thought, what a waste of water. Never mind the rug, the books and the baseboards—this was the snowpack melting off of the Rockies, the water we need in Lake Mead, the type of clean, drinkable water West Virginians had recently lost to contamination—now soaking into the foundation of my guest bedroom.

  • River of Hope

    By Heidi Kyser

    Las Vegans who bristle at the occasional outsider’s suggestion that the city is doomed to die of thirst now have at their disposal a smart new rebuttal in the form of an international water agreement. Next time a Northeasterner makes you feel like a squatter in a condemned building, whip this out: Minute 319, the Interim International Cooperative Measures in the Colorado River Basin. Those interested in really knowing what they’re talking about, however, should read on, for the deal is not what it seems in some headlines.

  • Dispatch

    The Big Dump

    By David Staton

    This election cycle has brought much consternation and gnashing of teeth about tax loopholes. They’re top of mind and tip of the tongue for politicians, pundits and the public. In August, Bloomberg Businessweek’s Brendan Greeley wrote that doing away with such loopholes was “an idea appealing in principle and toxic in practice.” Greeley was speaking […]

  • Dispatch

    The Big Dump

    By David Staton

    This election cycle has brought much consternation and gnashing of teeth about tax loopholes. They’re top of mind and tip of the tongue for politicians, pundits and the public. In August, Bloomberg Businessweek’s Brendan Greeley wrote that doing away with such loopholes was “an idea appealing in principle and toxic in practice.”

  • Dispatch

    So Long, Starry Skies

    By Heidi Kyser

    A little more than 90,000 people visit Great Basin National Park each year. Compare that to Zion’s 2.8 million visitors and you begin to understand that Great Basin, nestled in Nevada’s White Pine County, is a sort of stealth park, an under-the-radar beauty. Maybe that’s why it’s a frequent target for really bad ideas. The latest is part of the Southern Nevada Water Authority’s plan to pump tens of thousands of acre-feet of water per year from valleys in northeastern Nevada and bring it to Las Vegas via a massive pipeline that would cost upward of $3 billion.

  • Utilities

    Waterboarded

    By

    Last Call at the Oasis left me super depressed and reluctant to bathe. The documentary released earlier this year about global water shortages featured scene upon scene of parched farms and dying children, along with familiar indictments of water-sucking villains like Las Vegas, and a curt warning from local water czar Pat Mulroy about the coming waterless apocalypse. What the film didn’t include was any hint that the way to stop the apocalypse was for the Southern Nevada Water Authority to severely raise the water fees on charities.

  • The Week

    Is the Water Authority’s Magic All Tapped Out?

    By Bob Whitby

    It was, ironically, World Water Day—March 22—when the Nevada state engineer decided it was OK for the Southern Nevada Water Authority to pump 84,000 acre-feet of ancient groundwater annually from arid Northern Nevada to your front lawn. World Water Day, a United Nations event that focuses attention on sustainable management of freshwater in an increasingly thirsty world, has been held every March 22 since 1992.

  • Dispatch

    Fracking the Colorado Myth

    By David Staton

    In the shadows of the Rocky Mountain foothills, the St. Vrain Creek meanders eight miles east to Sandstone Ranch. Bike and pedestrian paths wind past lush parks, the county fairgrounds, wildlife habitats and ballfields. Here, less than 20 miles from downtown Boulder, all is serene—and quintessentially Colorado. But tension lies beneath the surface. Tension and natural gas. TOP Operating, an oil and gas exploration and production company based in nearby Lakewood, Colo., owns the mineral rights that lie beneath Sandstone Ranch. And it plans to drill.

  • Water

    Walking the Pipeline

    By Bob Whitby

    Hearings to determine whether the Southern Nevada Water Authority will get a permit to pump 126,000 acre-feet of water annually from four rural valleys to Las Vegas wrap up in Carson City Nov. 18, but we have to wait until March to find out if Jason King, the state engineer tasked with deciding the issue, will OK the plan.

  • The Latest

    Where Will All the Water Come From?

    By Bob Whitby

    Perhaps you’ve heard that the Southern Nevada Water Authority wants to build a 300-mile pipeline to pump ground water from Northern Nevada to Las Vegas. The SNWA says it’s vital that we have another source of water because relying almost exclusively on the Colorado River via Lake Mead is risky and bad for business, so the agency is in Carson City right now asking the state engineer for permission to take 126,000 acre-feet of water annually out of the ground from rural Nevada valleys and send it to Southern Nevada.

  • Resources

    One Valley’s Thirst

    By Bob Whitby

    That thud you felt recently? It was the Bureau of Land Management finally releasing its 4,000-page Draft Environmental Impact Statement on the Southern Nevada Water Authority’s plan to build a pipeline to bring water from the Great Basin south to the Valley. The proposal has been around since the late ’80s, making the report—which took six years to write—seem speedy by comparison.