Vegas Seven

Concert Review

  • concertsConcert Review

    Dru Hill Turns Back the Clock

    By Brjden Crewe

    The quartet reminded fans of the classic songs that made them one of the most successful groups of the ’90s.

  • Concert Review

    Concert Review: Bonobo

    By Andreas Hale

    It may have been Bonobo’s first Vegas performance in his 15-year musical tenure, but it certainly shouldn’t be his last.

  • Concert Review

    Concert Review: ScHoolboy Q

    By Zoneil Maharaj

    Playing the first of two back-to-back shows that night, Q drifted seamlessly from unhinged party music to dark drug rap and gritty street tales.

  • Concert Review

    Concert Photos: 2014 Extreme Thing Sports and Music Festival

    By Brjden Crewe

    The Extreme Thing Sports and Music Festival is one of the most energetic events in Las Vegas. The day was filled with skateboarding, BMX competitions, pick-up basketball games and more than nine hours of music.

  • Concert Review

    Concert Review: Kobra and the Lotus

    By Jarret Keene

    Despite her band’s galloping thrash rhythms, Canadian iron maiden Kobra Paige had always struck me as pop and indebted to Evanescence’s Amy Lee. My confusion stemmed from the polish of Las Vegas-based producer Kevin Churko (Ozzy Osbourne, In This Moment) who tends to airbrush sonic warts. As a result, the Churko-touched songs on Lotus’s self-titled Universal Records debut sound like a bid for mainstream attention. But once Paige—draped in black leather, silver face paint and blonde dreads—stepped onstage with her ass-whuppin’ bandmates, there was no compromise.

  • Concert Review

    Concert Review: Two Gallants

    By Ashley Gates

    The raspy croon of lead singer Adam Stephen could shake the glitter off the walls of Beauty Bar. Two Gallants are a duo from San Francisco, but their raucous flavor of blustering Americana would suggest otherwise. Drummer Tyson Vogel was the string tying their sound together, constantly accelerating and slowing down the pace.

  • Concert Review

    Concert Review: Jewel

    By Deanna Rilling

    There was just a girl and her guitar. As part of her Greatest Hits Tour, Jewel appeared solo in a simple blue dress and cowboy boots, launching into “Near You Always.” “What do I feel like tonight?” she questioned, looking at a selection of guitars. Despite admitting only half her voice was working, the girl who was discovered in a coffee shop played off the audience’s requests.

  • Concert Review

    Concert Review: Kottonmouth Kings

    By Brjden Crewe

    “Psychedelic hip-hop punk rock” is how Orange County-based Kottonmouth Kings like to describe their music. As the veteran band brought their Fight to Unite tour to Sin City, T-shirts and tattoos were prominent among the multigenerational fans.

  • Concert Review

    Concert Review: Maps & Atlases

    By Ashley Gates

    Frontman Dave Davison’s modestly charming commentary on the ability to play outside after 1 a.m. set the mood for a pleasant evening. He was right: Playing outside after midnight is largely unheard of around the country, especially in Chicago, from which most of the members of Maps & Atlases hail. With the very first song, the Midwestern crew established themselves as technically masterful yet not overly serious.

  • Concert Review

    Concert Review: Viva Ska Vegas

    By Jill Roth

    Checkers, plaid, mohawks and mods amid a sea of bright red lipstick made up the look of the audience gyrating to the ferocious keyboard riffs, blaring trumpets and choppy electric guitar strums at Viva Ska Vegas.

  • Concert Review

    Natalie Merchant

    By Jarret Keene

    Backed by a 20-piece symphonic ensemble, the ex-10,000 Maniacs frontwoman, gray-haired and lovely at 49, stepped onstage … and botched her intro. “Welcome for coming,” she said. Realizing her flub, Merchant hilariously experimented with an Eastern European accent before launching into string- and horn-laden chamber-pop versions of songs culled from 2010 children’s-verse album Leave Your Sleep. She also rendered a half-dozen solo-career tunes from 1995’s Tigerlily and 2003’s The House Carpenter’s Daughter.

  • Concert Review

    Kodo

    By Jarret Keene

    The percussive music of Japanese drumming company Kodo did more than remind a packed audience why a superb-sounding facility like Reynolds Hall is important. The troupe’s ritualistic wallop also revealed how today’s skins-smacking Vegas shows—Blue Man Group, Cirque du Soleil’s Mystère—are indebted to the art form of ensemble drumming, or taiko. The roots of taiko can be traced to the pre-Christian era, and for two hours (which included a 20-minute intermission), one felt viscerally transported to a sonically enlivened, more primal world.

  • Concert Review

    Izzy Cox

    By Ashley Gates

    This one-woman band offered a sonic portal to a different world. Her tantric drum beats combined with what Cox calls “voodoo billy” guitar riffs, painting a portrait of sideshow circus freaks living in a twisted gypsy den. But that’s just her music. Cox’s powerful voice pierced the air, inviting the audience to read her heartbreak-laden diary pages. She calls herself the “murder ballad queen” because of her affinity for lyrics such as I’m gonna burn, burn, burn your house to the ground, and I feel, I feel like killin’/Something’s wrong with my brain.

  • Concert Review

    Styx

    There’s been a growing trend in recent years of bands eschewing the traditional hit-packed concert format in favor of playing an album in its entirety. It’s a marketing strategy that’s as brilliant (“Hey fans, come hear songs you haven’t heard live in decades—if ever!”) as it is dangerous (“Oh, shit, do we know what we’re doing here?”) That danger quotient is multiplied when the set list features not one, but two albums.

  • Concert Review

    Betty Buckley

    By Danny Axelrod

    On the first of a four-show run, the Broadway legend tackled with aplomb the gender-bending task of performing songs traditionally written for men. The result was fun and fluid as she engaged the audience in a master class of great American songwriting. Backed by a flawless trio, including French pianist and arranger Christian Jacob, Buckley culled from a variety of sources, beginning with “I Can See It” from The Fantasticks. It quickly became an intimate affair, as Buckley shared her connection to each song from her album, Ah, Men! The Boys of Broadway.

X
X